Corps confirms Raystown Lake Dam, Pa., is prepared to perform during storms

Raystown Dam courtesy US Army Corps of Engineers

Aerial photo of Raystown Dam from the US Army Corps of Engineers website.

BALTIMORE – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has notified emergency management officials that the dam at Raystown Lake in Huntingdon, Pa., is prepared to perform during the storms connected to Hurricane Sandy.

The dam and reservoir has been functioning as designed – to store significant volumes of water and thus reducing downstream flows and delaying possible flooding over the next few days. The project is monitored daily and there are no indications of any problems. The dam will continue to function as designed and is prepared to hold the maximum amount of water if needed.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began construction on the dam in 1962 and it was completed in 1988 at a cost of $77 million. The project has prevented $269,616 million of flood damages through fiscal year 2011. The dam protects all areas along the Juniata River downstream of Huntingdon.

The project is an earth and rockfill structure with a maximum height of 225 feet and a top length of 1,700 feet. There is a two-bay gated spillway with two tainter gates, 45 feet wide by 45 feet high, to control flood flows. The overflow section is cut through rock at elevation 812 mean sea level, and has crest length of 1,630 feet in the spur of Terrace Mountain. The spillway and overflow section
have a combined discharge capacity of 301,000 cubic feet per second. The project encompasses 29,700 total acres. On April 3, 1993 the lake reached its pool of record at elevation 802.89 NGVD which was 67% of its storage capacity.

For current information on Baltimore District dams and reservoirs, go to their home page, www.nab.usace.army.mil.

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