Lifestyle

15 Minutes to the Dock or Trail?

Many visitors to Raystown Lake and Huntingdon County find this area to be a place to enjoy throughout the seasons or to settle down in. Beautiful scenery, friendly people and the opportunity for year-round outdoor recreation make this a place to want to be when you’re ready to relax and enjoy time with friends and family. Many who have visited the Raystown area for years decide to retire here and make their vacations permanent.

Photo by Kevin Mills, www.twophotografers.com

Photo by Kevin Mills, http://www.twophotografers.com

Members of the Huntingdon County Board of REALTORS are here to help you find a home, cabin or land to build or hunt on. REALTORS are more than real estate agents. As members of the National Association of REALTORS we are required to abide by a strict Code of Ethics designed to protect the public and encourage home ownership. You can view our available properties at http://www.RaystownHomes.com where it’s easy to request additional information or arrange to see properties. Member brokers and agents work in cooperation in a Multiple Listing Service (MLS) so that the agent you chose to work with can show you any broker’s properties no matter who they’re listed with saving you time and letting you stay with an agent you know.

Huntingdon County began as an agricultural community and still remains primarily rural. That’s why the Raystown Lake area feels more relaxed than many recreational destinations. Properties are generally well priced compared to other areas. Homes and cabins start around $70,000 for a simple cabin or mobile home in the country. A home in one of the many small towns can be a good value as well.

There are lots and larger tracts of land available for sale should you decide to build. 1-2 acre lots generally start around $28,000 and go up depending on size, location and terrain. Open lots are easy to build on, but wooded lots are currently favored and cost a bit more. Because of the variety of terrain and locations there is no single “per acre” price for larger tracts.

As a rural area our housing inventory is smaller than in a metropolitan area. While there is certainly a wide range of properties and prices, there may be few of any one type or in a particular location. That’s why it’s especially important to engage one of our REALTORS early in your search so they get to know what you want and can let you know when the right property becomes available. They can also suggest other properties that you hadn’t considered. Buyers working with agents tend to find their desired property in less time than those simply searching on their own.

The Huntingdon County Board of REALTORS is here to help when you’re ready to begin your search.

Dan Guyer
Apex Realty Group
Huntingdon County Board of REALTORS

Categories: 2015 Visitors Guide, Lifestyle | Leave a comment

The Road Less Traveled

By Kevin Cook and Ed Stoddard

At the time of this article, Kevin Cook, was the baker at McBurney Manor bed and breakfast, living and working along a road less traveled; where life slows down just like the traffic. McBurney Manor is just down the road a piece from Greenwood Furnace State Park. Along that path you can stop in for some of Mary Lou’s meatloaf at Couch’s Country Store. The C. Barton McCann School of Art sculpture garden and gallery are worth special arrangements for a scheduled visit.

C. Barton McCann School of Art. Photo by Ed Stoddard.

C. Barton McCann School of Art. Photo by Ed Stoddard.

We have many great state parks along our roads less traveled in Huntingdon County, Whipple Dam State Park is a gem in the mountains of Stone Valley – not too far from Shavers Creek Environmental Center. You can make a day of it by visiting the raptor center at Shavers Creek, rent a canoe at Whipple Dam and have dinner at the award-winning Doan’s Bones Barbecue.

Meander through Huntingdon (one of the coolest small towns in PA per Budget Travel magazine) for a stop in at the newly renovated Station General Store, located in the old Huntingdon train station. You might want to tuck in a vegan lunch at Boxers or stop for a fine coffee at Standing Stone Coffee Company.

Take a trip into Mount Union to visit the historical society and buildings there. This area is known for textiles and industry – being along the old East Broad Top Railroad line and also for its sand quarries that are still worked today for some of the finest sand in all of the United States. Our current Riverview Business Center is not too far from the borough of Mount Union.

Head to some of the most scenic locations in the area while you visit. Trough Creek State Park and the Trough Creek Valley are some of the most scenic locations in Pennsylvania – any time of the year. There are some great events that happen in this area too; like Oktoberfest in Cassville each year in September. Cassville Food Mart and Deli is a great spot for lunch and you will not leave hungry.

The Saxton Area is the southern gateway to Raystown Lake and is a popular destination for kayakers and bass fisherman. Saxton Outdoor Supply has fishing gear and bait or any hunting gear you might need through the seasons.

You will find great surprises around each bend on the road less traveled in the Raystown Lake Region. We encourage you to explore our sights, sounds, tastes and moments of solace.

Balanced Rock at Trough Creek State Park. Photo by Ed Stoddard.

Balanced Rock at Trough Creek State Park. Photo by Ed Stoddard.

 

Categories: 2013 Visitors Guide, Dining, Lifestyle, Things to Do | Leave a comment

Go outside, get happy!

By Bobbi Hicks

In a world where people are too often bogged down with responding to emails and jumping on their next conference call, it’s refreshing to know that retreats like the Raystown Lake Region exist. As a transplant to Huntingdon County, I quickly found that the natural beauty of the area makes it nearly impossible not to close your laptop, go outside, and get happy.

Matt_Raystown_Paddleboard_ecsDSC_6866www

If getting outside is your goal, there are a plethora of things to fill your time and your spirits. I’m a firm believer that a family that paddles together stays together. That said, if you haven’t tried it, I highly recommend renting a few Stand Up Paddleboard (SUP) from Rothrock Outfitters, Seven Points Marina or the Lake Raystown Resort, Lodge and Conference Center and getting out on the water for a sunset paddle. The views are breathtaking and the time that you get to spend unplugged with your family is invaluable. For Yogis visiting the lake, there’s nothing like performing sun salutations on a SUP as the sun peeks over the mountains to take your practice to the next level.

For those visiting the area that prefer to stay on dry land, taking a walk, run, or bike ride on the 2.5 mile Greenside Pathway is an enjoyable way to spend the afternoon. The pathway connects 19 different recreation facilities and is composed from 100% recycled tires, which means that your run, ride, or walk will not only be convenient, but comfortable.  Win-win, right?!

If getting out of your comfort zone and into the woods is more your speed, then grab your GPS and take to the trails and surrounding area for a Geocaching adventure! For those unfamiliar with Geocaching, it is basically a real life, outdoor treasure hunt. Several caches have been placed by Juniata College in partnership with the Corps of Engineers around the Seven Points Recreation Area. Each site has a set of GPS coordinates that indicate where a local geocache is hidden. Using a GPS enabled device, the adventurer navigates themself to the coordinates and then searches the site for a hidden Geocache (container). A list of local Geocaches can be found at http://www.geocaching.com.

When you’re visiting the Raystown Lake Region, go outside, explore all that our region has to offer, and get happy. Tour the local waters by SUP, keep it low-key with a stroll along the Greenside Pathway, and go adventuring for Geocaches. The biggest risk that you’ll take is the possibility that you may never want to leave.

Bobbi and a group of friends enjoy an evening of paddleboarding on Raystown Lake. Photo by Helena Kotala.

Bobbi and a group of friends enjoy an evening of paddleboarding on Raystown Lake.

 

About the author: Trailblazer. Raconteur. Adrenaline junkie… “Carpe Diem!” Bobbi is a mom, wife, and Juniata College graduate currently living life to the fullest in Huntingdon County, PA. 

Categories: 2014 Visitors Guide, Lifestyle, Outdoor Recreation | Tags: , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The arrival of winter.

The arrival of winter..

via The arrival of winter..

Categories: Lifestyle, Things to Do | Leave a comment

“Summer’s over, things must really slow down for you. Right?”

Source: US Army Corps of EngineersAfter Labor Day weekend, I and my staff at the Huntingdon County Visitors Bureau hear this a lot from friends, family,  neighbors, and other community acquaintances: “Now that summer’s over, you get to relax.  Right?”  While it is true that the part of our job that includes serving visitors on-site at the Raystown Lake Region Visitors Center does slow down a bit after Labor Day, we still expect to serve around 3,500 visitors over the counter during September and October (compared to just over 10,000 during July and August).

But visitor services is far from all that we do.  In the late summer and fall, the focus of our staff shifts partially from serving visitors to recruiting businesses into the association, planning and selling advertising for the 2013 Huntingdon County/Raystown Lake Region Visitors Guide, updating the look, feel and functionality of our website at Raystown.org, and mapping out strategies for advertising and promotion to attract new visitors in 2013.

September and October weekends are also jam-packed with events in the Raystown Lake Region.  Starting this weekend with the Greenwood Furnace Folk Gathering, and continuing with fantastic festivals, craft fairs, historic interpretations, harvest activities, and Hauntingdon events, and more through Halloween!  This is prime-time to come visit us.  The water and daytime temperatures are still warm enough for water sports, and the nights are cool enough for cuddling up by a campfire or fireplace, and getting a good night’s sleep, and best of all, if you can make it mid-week, you’ll feel like the entire 8,300 acre Raystown Lake belongs to you and you alone!

So have a great fall!  We’ll be “relaxing” at the office, ready to help you have a great Raycation! 😉

Categories: Events, HCVB News, Lifestyle, Things to Do, Tourism Industry | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Great public concerts this weekend at Folk College

One of many jam sessions at Folk College, Huntingdon, PA photo by Johanna Ballreich

One of many jam sessions at Folk College, Huntingdon, PA (photo by Johanna Ballreich)

This  is the 7th annual Folk College weekend in Huntingdon! Come and  experience some of the best folk music has to offer, ranging from traditional Irish to world renowned Mark O’Connor, Spanish percussion and contemporary interpretations of traditional music.
Concerts are held  on Friday and Saturday evenings, May 25 and 26 in Rosenberger Auditorium on the Juniata College Campus, starting at 7 pm. Tickets  are available atthe door, $10 for HCAC members, $12 for all others.

Friday evening features:
Simple Gifts
Four Shillings Short
Tom Lozano and Polly Ferber
and a special appearance by Mark O’Connor.

Saturday:
The Horseflies
Twilite Broadcasters
Atwater-Donnelly
adjunct staff
and a contra dance

Check out details online at www.folkcollege.com.

Categories: Events, Lifestyle, Things to Do | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Welcome to the Water!

Publisher’s Note:  As we kick off another summer season with Memorial Day Weekend, we thought it would be a good time to share an excerpt from our 2002 Raystown Lake Region/Huntingdon County Visitors Guide.

Raystown Lake Recreation Area

We are proud to offer the largest lake within the state. With it’s 118 miles of shoreline, 8,300 acres of clean, clear water and 30 miles (as a bald eagle flies) of lake, there is plenty of room to enjoy all kinds of water activity. What most people like about the lake is that except for just a few miles that are developed, nature’s beauty is the backdrop. The US Army Corp of Engineers manages the lake; they operate campgrounds in the Seven Points Recreation Area, Nancy’s Camp and Susquehannock. Eight launch ramps are available for boaters, the lake has no size or horsepower restrictions, and personal watercrafts are welcome. Picnic Pavilions are available for rent and weekend events are provided at the Seven Points Amphitheater. Hiking trails have been developed in 4 areas of the facility. There are four private concessions on the lake, which offer a wide range of services including camping, restaurants, marinas, amusements, entertainment and accommodations.

Shallow water is really not an issue for general running on the lake, the average depth is 80 feet, and some have graphed depths upwards of 200 feet.  Although some structures do exist, the rumor that a town was flooded is just that, a story.

For swimmers, skiers and personal watercraft users, wet suits are common until the end of May, beginning of June.  In July and August surface temps are 75-80 degrees. Visit the Raystown Lake Visitors Center in the 7 Points Recreation Area for more information, plus a gorgeous view of the lake!

WATER ACTIVITIES

BOATING

Raystown Lake glassy at Seven Points Marina photo by Abram Eric Landes, aelandesphotography.com

Early in the morning, Raystown Lake is calm, and the waters are glassy. (Photo by Abram Eric Landes aelandesphography.com

The PA Fish and Boat Commission enforce rules and regulations; a license is required for all motorized vessels. Persons using Personal Watercraft must have a certification.

Boating on Raystown Lake

All sizes of boats are welcome on Raystown Lake; there are no restrictions of horsepower.  During the busy weekends in July and August, it is suggested that those using small boats consider using Weavers Falls, Aitch, James Creek and Snyders Run areas, which have easy access to the abundant no-wake areas.  There are 8 public boat launches, since our lake rarely freezes completely; boaters can usually enjoy the lake year round. Boat rentals, and launch and park services are available at the marinas; water trampolines are also available.  The US Army Corps of Engineers no longer charges a launch fee at the 8 public launch ramps.

SWIMMING

Seven Points Beach photo by Kevin Mills, picturesbykevin.com

Seven Points Recreation Area Beach on Raystown Lake (Photo by Kevin Mills picturesbykevin.com

The public beaches at Seven Points and Tatman Run at Raystown Lake offer refreshing relief on a dog day afternoon. For those who boat, we encourage swimming in the “no-wake” areas, rather than the main stream. Three of our state parks offer swimming as well.  Greenwood Furnace State Park offers a 300 foot sand beach on Greenwood Lake from Memorial Day to Labor Day. Whipple Dam offers guarded beaches and cool waters for swimming in a beautiful environment. Cool off in our clean water resources!

WATER SKIING

Water Ski Magazine recently named Raystown Lake as a water ski haven. On the Lake, serious skiers find glass!  For those with little time to explore, try the mountainside of the lake between mile markers 25 & 26; 10 & 8; 4& 2; 2&1. You’ll find the best skiing during the week, and on weekends try VERY early morning and after 5pm.  Ski and toy rentals are available at the boat dealers around the area, just use the guideto find your options.

Water skiing on Raystown Lake photo by Kevin Mills, picturesbykevin.com

Water skiing is a popular activity on Raystown Lake (photo by Kevin Mills, picturesbykevin.com)

Categories: 2002 Visitors Guide, Lifestyle, Past Visitors Guides, Things to Do | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Huntingdon Lifestyle as defined by Webster’s

Publisher’s Note: This article first appeared in the 2008 edition of the Raystown Lake Region/Huntingdon County Visitors Guide.

 By Lisa Roth

Webster’s defines the noun lifestyle as a way of life or style of living that reflects the values and attitudes of an individual or group. Prior to 1993, I would have to say my husband’s and my own style of living reflected packrat values coupled with a lazy nomadic attitude. In other words, when it became impossible to ignore the need to spring-clean it became entirely possible to move. So move we did, every two or three years thanks to our educational needs, and we averted many a spring-clean as a result.

Then came our move to Huntingdon with a toddler and dog in tow. That move, coupled with having our first child, was the beginning of a whole new level of “expensive toy buying years.” John and I bought our first car, then another, our first home, then another one, two, three kids arrived, and more pets. One day I looked up and 15 years had passed.

We had been so busy growing a family, a career, a zoo-like atmosphere that we never stopped long enough to realize we had also grown roots. Strong, powerful roots. The years had passed and we hadn’t moved, like clockwork, to another place. Why didn’t we?

Huntingdon had ceased to be our stepping stone and instead became our destination. While it is neither the fastest nor slowest paced place in which I have lived, I love it. In 10 minutes, I can be anywhere downtown on foot and anywhere in town by vehicle. Driving time in this county IS driving time, not sitting in traffic time.

Here I am surrounded by natural beauty; cradled by gently sloping hills, ridges, and Tussey Mountain and lulled to sleep by meandering streams, creeks, and Juniata River. My heart soars with the birds of prey overhead and pounds at the sight of majestic bald eagles nesting at Raystown Dam.

We enjoy good food, good neighbors and friends, in a quiet, small town atmosphere. The county is rich with history, architecture, and wildlife and we enjoy many outdoor activities afforded us by its landscape. It is still a great place in which to raise a family.

Webster’s sociological definition of roots is the condition of being settled and of belonging to a particular place or society. John and I have now lived in Huntingdon longer than anywhere else, over our entire lives. Whatever your reason for visiting Huntingdon, make it a point to look around, try something familiar, and also something new. Breathe, relax, enjoy, maybe you’ll grow roots too.

Lisa Roth is a Development Specialist for College Advancement at Juniata College.

Webster’s is a dictionary.

Categories: 2008 Visitors Guide, Lifestyle, Retirement | Tags: , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Come out to the Huntingdon County Home and Outdoor Show this weekend!

Huntingdon County Home and Outdoor Show

Huntingdon County Home and Outdoor Show

Categories: Events, Lifestyle, Shopping, Things to Do | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Herb Lady is Scheduled to Speak at Next Lunch and Learn

Huntingdon’s new cultural district partnership, 4 and More, will present its next Lunch & Learn event on Monday, March 12 at noon in the Natural Connection Wellness Center at the corner of 4th and Mifflin Streets in downtown Huntingdon. Ann Marie Wishard, expert herbalist and owner of Sweet Annie Herbs, will talk about the medicinal, cosmetic, and culinary uses of herbs.

Wishard, who moved her business to Huntingdon from Centre County fifteen years ago, has been studying, growing, and using herbs for almost four decades. She has formulated over 50 herbal and nutritional combinations to address a variety of health issues. She has spoken at Penn State University and other colleges, hospitals, retirement communities, and trade shows. Wishard has appeared on such nationally-recognized television programs as The Montel Williams Show, The Sally Jesse Raphael Show, and CNBC’s Alive and Wellness.  A published author, she wrote Herb Talk: The Book That Grows in 1996, and has since penned several revisions.

To order lunch, call Oven One at 814-643-6899 by 11am on the day of the event, and it will be waiting for you at the Wellness Center. The cost is $7.50, and includes a beverage. Audience members are also welcome to bring their own lunch to the event. The Lunch & Learn program is free and open to the public.

4 and More is an initiative involving the Huntingdon County Historical Society, the Huntingdon County Library, the Huntingdon County Arts Council, and the Huntingdon Health & Wellness Association, as well as various business partners in historic Huntingdon with a goal to promote the 4th Street Cultural District as a destination for arts, entertainment, education, shopping, and dining. Visit facebook.com/4andMoreHuntingdon for more information.

Categories: Events, Lifestyle, Things to Do | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

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